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How to tell your boss you’re quitting is a hard thing for most of us. But, hopefully, with these quick suggestions, it can be an easy and positive experience for you.

Quitting your job is hard. But in our minds, we make quitting a job much harder than it has to be. We generally think that quitting is a bad thing. This is wrong, wrong, wrong. Quitting should be a happy time for you. Here are 3 ways to tell your boss you’re quitting:

Tell Your Boss You're Quitting Your Job

1. You are a business. Quitting your job is a business decision.

You are your own business, even though your work for one. Every decision you make career-wise, should be viewed as a business decision. What will give me the greatest opportunity to succeed in the future. What opportunities will allow me to generate the most amount of income for me now, which ones will have the greatest earning power in the future?

Let your boss know that quitting is a decision that you don’t take lightly. But just like a business has to make hard decisions, you have to do the same. Tell your boss that you’re quitting because you need to look for additional opportunities to grow and to expand your career. Businesses make choices over supplies, providers, vendors, etc. based on money, availability, future potential, etc. You should do the same for your own career. Give your boss an adult reason why you’re quitting your job, he’s probably not thinking about that.

2. Quitting is not betraying your company, staying on too long may be.

Quitting your job is, too often, seen as turning your back on your employer and your co-workers. It’s not. We should approach any work situation thinking of what we can bring to our employers in terms of our skills, abilities, and talents. Also keeping in mind that in return, your employer will also provide you with economic compensation and experience in the workplace in return for your efforts.

But once you’ve been able to do all you can to help the business and it becomes just a daily grind, nothing new, same thing day after day, what then? What about when the business outgrows or moves in a direction that may not be a good fit for your skills and abilities? When you feel like you’ve done all you can in your position, it’s time to think about quittingQuitting your job is letting your company move on or telling the company you’re ready to move on to new projects and they can use a new set of eyes on the work you’ve been doing. Tell your boss that you’re quitting because you feel like you’re ready to take on a new role, or new resposibilities, he’s probably not thinking about that.

3. Quitting your job can be good. Remember you have a career end-goal in mind.

We almost never take on a position or job thinking that it’s where we want to be until we retire. Quitting your job is a way to make sure you’re sticking to your career track. We can be starting out, looking for that entry-level position that will give us additional experience and a resume point that will open doors in the future. We may be mid-career, and quitting means looking to take on a specific type of work that will allow us to expand into a new field, or get a little bit more experience in a particular area of business so that we can eventually qualify for the top positions in our field. Eventually we’ll realize that we’re ready to take that last job where we’ll be before we retire, that’ll require quitting a mid-career position.

Regardless of where we may be on the career ladder, today’s workplace is not the workplace of years past. We no longer sign up with a company and stay on until retirement. Successful careers require quitting your job as new opportunities come. Thank your boss, your co-workers, and the company for the opportunity to work with them. Telling your boss you’re quitting in a professional way will help maintain the relationships you’ve worked so hard to build.

This should be a happy time.

Telling your boss you’re quitting your job doesn’t mean giving up on people and the organization you’ve (hopefully) grown to love. You’re taking on a new position with new opportunities, new challenges, new and unique ways for you to utilize your skills and talents. Quitting is a necessary step for you to grow.

Regardless, quitting your job is never a bad thing when you’ve always put in a honest day’s work for an honest day’s pay. Let me know your thoughts on quitting your job or please share your experience on how it went! I’ll be featuring the best comment or experience on quitting your job in an upcoming post!